From the November 1999 issue of Entrepreneur

Get ready for another British invasion to sweep the country when pop band S Club 7 enters U.S. living rooms with their music-incorporated TV program, set to debut on the Fox Family Channel this month.

Configured by former Spice Girls manager Simon Fuller, S Club 7's sitcom, S Club 7 in Miami, places the four girl and three boy performers in madcap predicaments while they search for stardom in the States.

S Club 7 in Miami is now a top-rated show in the United Kingdom, and the group is topping the charts there with its first single.

"We're looking for S Club 7 to be as big, if not bigger, than some of the recent groups that came out of the UK," says Fox Family Channel's senior vice president, Joel Andryc. "When I heard about the creative team that was putting this together, we got really excited about its potential."

The seven members, aged 17 to 22, are an actual performing group who play themselves, using their real names on the show. Sound familiar? That's no coincidence: S Club 7 has already been deemed the new Monkees.

Andryc admits the winning combination of music, relationships and great story lines may borrow elements from the popular 1960s sitcom, but he maintains it stands out with its modern sensibility. "I don't think it's as wacky or goofy as The Monkees was," says Andryc. "Kids today are more sophisticated. [S Club 7] is a little more relationship-driven."

Nectar Of The Gods

Hannibal Lecter isn't the only one who enjoys "a nice chianti."

What can please the palate, stimulate the imagination and dance happily over your tongue?

The com-plex intensity of wine, of course. With Americans spending an estimated $17.1 billion on it in 1998 alone, the popularity of wine has provoked many a marketing strategy.

"Since consumer interest in wine has picked up in recent years, other luxury products associated with the `wine lifestyle' have gotten a bit of a boon," says Abigail Sawyer, editor-in-chief of Wine Business Monthly magazine.

Paraphernalia like ingenious corkscrews, elaborate storage aids and decorative wine bags, tags and ribbons are tempting savvy connoisseurs. Even food manufacturers have infused wine into items like biscuits, chocolate sauces and jellies. Indeed, as savvy marketers are finding out, this glass is clearly more than half full.

Pac-Man Fever

Old-school video games come out of retirement.

Gone is the hype of owning the latest Sega Dreamcast or Sony Playstation. Back are the beelines to the track-balls of antiques like Asteroids and Centipede. The search for video arcade classics, as well as obscure home-system cartridges, is the latest fad for collectors, and such items are soaring in value these days.

Generating an ever-increasing demand, the simplistic yet skill-sharpening games of yesteryear are out-doing their high-tech, vividly gory contemporaries, with numerous arcade owners and former aficionados buying them up at inflated prices. With a cocktail-table-sized Dig Dug starting at $595, for example, there's certainly new life for bad graphics.

So a well-kept, out-of-print game lingering in the basement--or a classic Frogger game table in your place of business--will surely attract fans looking for a screen on which to display their high-score initials.

Flash

Scent-sale-tional: Mood-enhancing scents are still growing in popularity and are now providing the opportunity for existing products to emanate their own trendy aromas. Virtually any item can be scented, so why not give your consumers an attitude adjustment by adding heartwarming aromas like sugar cookie, cinnamon toast or vanilla bean to existing wares?