Thirteen-year-old Girl Scout Danielle Lei has gainfully confirmed the age-old aphorism, “Location, location, location.”

When the San Francisco tween set up a Girl Scout cookie stand outside of a marijuana clinic called The Green Cross earlier this week, sales were unsurprisingly blazing.

Talk about a sugar high: munchie-ridden shoppers snapped up 117 boxes in a matter of hours, preferring the Dulce de Leche and Tagalong varieties, Mashable reports.

Lei’s mother, Carol, said that while she doesn’t condone smoking, the venue -- which she herself suggested -- serves to start a conversation with her daughters about the stigmas surrounding medical marijuana use.

Related: Government Shuts Down 11-Year-Old's Cupcake Business

Both The Green Cross and the local Girl Scouts organization were enthusiastically on board.

“Girls and their parents pick out places where they can make good sales," said Dana Allen, director of marketing and communications for Girl Scouts of Northern California. "We're not telling people where they can and can't go if it's a legitimate business."

"It's no secret that cannabis is a powerful appetite stimulant, so we knew this would be a very beneficial endeavor for the girls," said Holli Bert, a staffer at The Green Cross.

Related: Introducing Entrepreneur Barbie

The Girl Scouts of Colorado, on the other hand -- where limited recreational marijuana use was legalized just last month -- tweeted its staunch opposition to Lei’s enterprise.

“If you are wondering, we don’t allow our Girl Scouts to sell cookies in front of marijuana shops or liquor stores/bars,” the organization said. “It is not something we advocate for our youth to be involved in.”

Though Lei’s idea has proven preternaturally astute, the Girl Scouts has its own method of helping hungry consumers track down the elusive treats -- which only go on sale once every year for a limited time. The organization has a Cookie Finder app for both iOS and Android devices that locates and lists nearby sellers.

Related: High Hopes and Blunt Truths for the $2.3 Billion Legal Marijuana Market