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Future Earnings

Delos Smith

Senior business analyst at The Conference Board, a think tank for market-place knowledge

For 2001, consumer spending will be excellent. It might be a little slower than 2000 and 1999, but I can't see it going down to any extent because sky-high is sky-high.

Right now there is really no weakness in the country. That's one of the major differences in this period of enormous prosperity.

Seth Godin

Zoomer of Do You Zoom Inc., where change agents and idea merchants can ply their trade, and author of Unleashing the IdeaVirus (Do You Zoom Inc.)

There will be more and more clutter, making it harder for entrepreneurs to make an impression.

Ideas will spread from person to person much faster than they will from marketer to consumer.

Jennifer Fonstad

Managing director of Draper Fisher Jurvetson, an early-stage venture capital firm

We see a spectrum of markets emerging in 2001. Expect to see the migration of the network toward an all-optical infrastructure, with more young networking companies bursting onto the scene.

Also, look for more companies living on the network's edge: providing E2E (edge-to-edge) services (next-generation Akamai) and using distributed networking technology-like Napster but for useful business purposes-to relieve network constraints and enable better services for end users, such as streaming video, audio, instant-on and wireless alert services.

Wireless will continue to blossom, as services you never dreamed you needed will find you through your Palm Pilot or cell phone.

To use a baseball analogy, we're still in the bottom of the 3rd in this revolutionary period sparked by the Internet's emergence in 1995. 2001 will provide some exciting new companies to watch and be part of.

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This article was originally published in the December 2000 print edition of Entrepreneur with the headline: Future Earnings.

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