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Feedback

Letters from our readers

For Better or Worse?

The article "It Takes Two" ("Real Deal," May) on the potential woes (and pleasures) of partnership was a very good overview of some practical concerns partnerships can bring. However, the last item in the checklist, regarding what happens when a partner becomes disabled or dies, needs elaboration. And I know from experience.

What happens if a partner dies is practically a given-you usually inherit the partner's spouse or family as your new partners. If the partner is disabled, which is estimated to be twice as likely as death in most age groups, you'll often have a partner who's not fully productive but being paid half the profits.

One of the best ways to address these potential problems is with a buy-sell life insurance policy that covers the possibility of a partner dying, and a disability buyout policy that covers long-term or severe disabilities affecting a partner.

The beauty of both these policies is they not only protect the financial interests of the family with the loss, but also maintain the integrity of the business.

We sell many of these types of policies, and our biggest markets aren't start-ups-they're actually businesses that have been around awhile, realize they're successful and are planning for their long-term futures.

Myles Meyer Berman
CorPro Agency, Guardian Life
New York City

On the Move

Amanda C. Kooser hit the high points in her article on office furniture ("Buyer's Guide," May). But she also identified a common misconception when she wrote of installing furniture.

As the owner of a service company that installs office furniture, I want to point out that professionals exist to take on that project for buyers. Independent office furniture installation companies provide skilled office installers to complete furniture projects. These companies don't sell furniture-we install, reconfigure, refurbish, repair and move it. Our technicians work with all types of furniture, and we're not limited to any one manufacturer. We, and businesses like us, are listed in the phone book under "Office Furniture & Equipment, Installation." You'd be surprised how easy changing your business space can be.

Hope Dougherty
President
Changing Space Inc.
Harrisburg, Pennsylvania

Hey-No Wires

Every time I read a new issue of Entrepreneur, I find exciting new ideas. I love the idea of making my Web site wireless, so anyone, anywhere will have access to it ("Net Profits," May). Your magazine planted the seed, and I'll let the idea grow in my homebased business-which I love. I get so many benefits from promoting amateur and professional comic book writers and artists. I profit both from cash and through bartering, and I've received many professional pieces of comic book artwork signed by professionals in the industry-artwork that will become increasingly valuable as time goes on. Life couldn't be more enjoyable!

Paul Dale Roberts
Jazma Universe Online
Elk Grove, California

Tech That!

The first rule of business is to listen to your customers. I've put that principle into practice in my own business after reading about it in your magazine and on your Web site, Entrepreneur.com. I'm sure we'd all agree on how important it is.

Why do you persist in the almost total emphasis on high-tech? There is a world beyond Silicon Valley. Live a little-dare to be different!

Variety is the spice of life, as they say, and we need some variety when reading about entrepreneurial endeavors. More important, we can all learn from varied experiences.

Debra K. Sawdey
Hillsdale, Michigan

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This article was originally published in the July 2001 print edition of Entrepreneur with the headline: Feedback.

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