11. Get connected. Don't suffer without e-mail while you're on the road. A few years ago, you could afford to take a break from your inbox but no longer. The Europe Access Pack from 1-800-Batteries all but guarantees you'll make a connection. The package includes 20 telephone adaptors and six grounded power adaptors, plus an in-line telephone coupler, a modular dual telephone adaptor, a two-line adaptor and an RJ11 retractable phone cable. Use them anywhere from Austria to Russia. The whole kit costs $230.
Insider tip: Too thrifty to buy the package? Pack a screwdriver and make the connections yourself. (You'll want to practice before you leave.)

12. Stay connected. Make sure your laptop remains in peak condition during your trip. Symantec's Mobile Essentials 2.0, for instance, is a nifty application that helps you connect to the Internet while you're away from the office. It handles complex and time-consuming tasks, such as troubleshooting, with ease and reduces your setup time significantly. At a cost of about $70, the current release will probably save you lots of headaches.
Insider tip: A little know-how will make these kinds of programs unnecessary. However, if time is short, they're indispensable.

13. Remember your ATM card. Accepted in nearly every major international city, ATM cards are safer than carrying cash and less cumbersome than travelers' checks. Using credit cards or ATM cards also helps you avoid the sky-high commissions banks charge to exchange your currency.
Insider tip: Your bank can furnish you with a list of locations where your ATM card will be accepted.

14. Don't worry about the euro. You won't notice much of a change-for now. Travelers heading to Europe shouldn't give a second thought to the new currency being used in paperless transactions. While the euro will mean significant changes in Europe, for business travelers using [credit] cards, it'll be business as usual.
Insider tip: Euro notes and coins won't be in circulation until 2002

15. Don't forget the chambers of commerce. There are 85 U.S. Chambers of Commerce around the world that offer a number of insights and services for companies that want to go global. Chambers will help a U.S. business owner get settled in his or her new country and give start-up advice on everything from customs to the business climate. Call (800) 649-9719 for more information.
Insider tip: A U.S. Chamber of Commerce is often an entrepreneur's first contact in a foreign city. The community of expatriates found there often becomes a de facto social club for travelers.