From the June 2003 issue of Entrepreneur

If you have room in your garage, a trio of Cadillacs can fulfill all your driving needs: the SRX SUV for work and weekends, the XLR convertible for vacations, and the strictly-for-business CTS sedan.

The new midsized 2004 SRX ($32,500) goes into production this summer. This SUV crossover is luxury all the way with a spectacular (optional) 5-foot sunroof, clutchless and automatic shifting and Stabilitrak suspension control. As an all-wheel-drive or a five- or seven-passenger rear-wheel-drive, it can tow 3,500 pounds with a 4.6-liter 315-horsepower Northstar V-8 engine with 310 pound-feet of torque. Cargo space is flexible-the second row of seats folds flat, and the optional third row power-folds into the floor. Styled with a squared-off front and curved rear end, the SRX is unmistakably a Cadillac.

After business hours, the sporty 2004 XLR convertible ($72,000) is ready for the road. The two-seater boasts a power-retractable hard top, agility and high performance with the same engine as the SRX. It has a longer wheelbase and more horsepower than the Jaguar XK8, the Lexus SC430 or the Mercedes-Benz SL500. The XLR is loaded with technology, including keyless ignition, an OnStar concierge, navigation and entertainment center, and heated seats. A display projects driving information onto the windshield.

Need more room? The 2003 CTS ($30,000) seats five adults. A touring sedan destined for the global market, it has a European-influenced, high-tech interior and businesslike styling. The entry-level four-door model has a 3.2-liter V-6 engine with 220 horsepower and a five-speed manual or automatic transmission. More affordable than Cadillac's flagship models, the CTS is nevertheless packed with a full range of luxury trim and tech features, such as a mouse button on the steering wheel for audio control and all-around traction control.


Editor and consultant Jill Amadio has been reporting on the automotive industry for 24 years.