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Feedback 11/05

Cost of Co-Registration?
I recently read your article "Partner Power" ("Net Sales," August) about using co-registration campaigns. It was misleading on pricing and incomplete as far as ways to find co-registration providers. The article only mentions the usefulness of co-registration in obtaining newsletter subscribers. However, it is also very effective in enticing consumers to sign up for memberships, loyalty programs, catalog subscriptions, product launches, special offers and more.

The only co-registration leads advertisers can purchase for such low prices as those in your article are usually from opt-out or incentivized offers. Running an incentivized campaign works if the purpose of the campaign is simply to build a bulk list. However, if advertisers are looking to acquire new customers, it is difficult to tell whether those consumers are truly interested in the advertisers' offer, or whether they knew they were signing up for it at all. To run a legitimate opt-in co-registration campaign, advertisers can expect to pay at least 25 cents for basic consumer contact information, and the price goes up from there. It is difficult to test a sound media mix of co-registration sites with the small budgets suggested in the article. To run a quality campaign, we usually tell our clients to spend at least $10,000.

Certainly, the Co-Registration Directory is a good resource to search for partners, but there are other means to find them, including the Direct Marketing Association's website and by typing "co-registration" into a major search engine.

Scott Mason
Director of Marketing
Innovation Ads
New York City

"Net Sales" columnist Catherine Seda responds: Companies that manage special offers and customer programs as separate sign-up processes, not from within one newsletter, can absolutely use co-registration for any lead- or sales-generation campaign. And while it's helpful to know that your company recommends a 25 cents per lead/$10,000 minimum investment, growing entrepreneurs can test non-incentive-based, opt-in solutions for less money.

The Real Deal
This is in response to "Editor's Note" in the August issue regarding only franchisees reading your magazine.

I am an entrepreneur and have been for 15 years. I am an avid reader of all the small-business magazines, but yours is the best! I am living proof that what you said about real entrepreneurs reading your magazine is true.

I have been an avid reader of Entrepreneur for years, and it has been not only inspirational to me, but also extremely helpful in my internet businesses, www.spycop.com and www.goldmaker.com. Keep up the excellent work.

Grey McKenzie
Panama City, Florida

Customers Aren't King?
"Treasure Hunt," ("Flash," August) states that businesses could show customers we appreciate them by "acknowledging flaws, resolving conflicts quickly and positively, and proactively encouraging feedback." We couldn't agree more. However, we've found what some businesses think about customer feedback shocking.

We speak with many local and national companies who claim they are all about customer service. We ask if they will take ownership of their free Deaseil entry, which will allow their customers to rate and provide unfiltered feedback about them. The companies can then respond live online and give thanks for praise or take care of a problem. The majority of businesses we speak with are rude, slam the phone down or inform us they have no time to address customer feedback. Many demand to be removed from the site. We feel it is every consumer's right to know the reputation of a company, and we should never have to pay for that information. So why are so many businesses afraid to take feedback? We are not sure. But one thing is certain: Many superior businesses do welcome and respond to publicly displayed feedback. They deserve our patronage and recognition.

Anne Hornby Deaseil Girl
Deaseil
Cary, North Carolina

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This article was originally published in the November 2005 print edition of Entrepreneur with the headline: Feedback 11/05.

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