What do you do with your press releases when you're done with them? Do you file them away and forget about them? Or do they just get tossed in the trash? Well, don't dismiss those press releases just yet. Consider these nine ideas for getting more use out of them.

1. Use them as web copy. Extract facts, statistics and quotes from experts, and use them as supporting website content. Weave into your website comments from satisfied customers or people who've tested your product or service as testimonials.

2. Add them to your press kit. Make copies of your press releases, and add them to your print media kit. Save the releases as a PDF or HTML file, and add them to the electronic version of your media kit. Your press releases will help serve as additional research material for media requesting more information.

3. Start an online newsroom. Add a "newsroom" to your website, and include links to your press releases there. An online newsroom, complete with current and archived press releases, gives you credibility in the minds of site visitors. Also, reporters will appreciate you for making their jobs easier by putting additional information at their fingertips.

4. Use them in your newsletter. Turn your press releases into articles for your newsletter or e-zine. Or summarize your press release, and use it as an abstract in the news section of your newsletter.

5. Blog them. Add your press release to your blog. A blog equipped with an RSS feed could be a catalyst for more media coverage.

6. Use them as ad copy. Use content from informational press releases in advertorials or to give a space ad more credibility. Mold the headlines of your press releases into crisp and compelling ad headlines.

7. Use them in your direct-mail pieces. Extract pertinent information and quotes for use in your direct-mail letters and packages. Or include the entire release as a direct-mail supplement.

8. Create a brochure. Turn a tips press release into an informational brochure. Then give it out at networking events or send it to your current list of clients, prospects and other business contacts.

9. Rewrite them and redistribute them. Take some time to brainstorm ideas and find a new angle for your press releases. Informative press releases, such as those that include tips, can be rewritten for a specific audience. This works especially well if your target market can be broken into sub-audiences. Consider rewriting a press release on summer skincare with a skincare hook for men or children. Even if your press releases are outdated, such as ones that announce a new product launch or special event, a little brainstorming will likely lead you to find a new way to spin it.

You pay good money for your press releases or spend a lot of time writing them. Don't send them to the PR scrap yard! By thinking a little more creatively, you can get more mileage out of them to help benefit your business.

Ayana Glaze is an Atlanta-based freelance copywriter and consultant who offers tips on writing and marketing in her monthly newsletter, The Copywriter's Closet. She also coaches PR do-it-yourselfers at GetPRHelp.com.