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How to Decode Website Metrics to Pump Up Your Online Marketing

Here's a primer on the stats and terminology you need to know to track and improve your online marketing efforts.
June 2, 2011
URL: http://www.entrepreneur.com/article/219747

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To understand how your online marketing efforts are performing and how you can improve them, you'll need to regularly track and analyze the metrics from those campaigns. These metrics highlight the areas on your website, blog or in your online marketing program where you're doing well, what needs additional tweaking and processes that need to be scrapped.

Understanding metrics can help enable you to identify big problems such as poor timing, inconsistent search phrases, incorrect prospect definitions and flawed audiences. Most importantly, it can help avoid wasting time and money due to poorly-executed websites or marketing campaigns.

The tricky part is knowing the different types of metrics and how they affect your business. Here, I've assembled a glossary of terms you'll need to know to successfully track, analyze and improve your online and email marketing campaigns.

Google AdWords Metrics
If you are using Google AdWords -- which offers pay-per-click advertising and site-targeted advertising for text, banner, and rich-media ads -- then you should get familiar with the following terms:

Email Metrics
For email campaigns, many of the metric names are different but track some of the same things. It's useful to uncover what your industry's standard numbers are so that you can compare your own success rate. The terms you'll need to know include:

Website and Blog Metrics
You can also track visitor activity on a website, blog or landing page. Google Analytics supplies much of this information at no cost. Some of the metrics it follows are:

Deciding which of these metrics you wish to analyze will depend on the campaign you are undertaking. Once you determine your methods and metrics, download a sample metrics report and begin analyzing them monthly. This can help you identify how your efforts are improving and where additional effort might be needed.

The Accidental Sales ManagerThis article is an excerpt from the book Outcome-Based Marketing available from Entrepreneur Press.