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Are You Coachable?

June 1, 2012
URL: http://www.entrepreneur.com/article/223599

How Coachable Are You

"Our chief want in life is somebody who shall make us do what we can." -- Ralph Waldo Emerson

If you believe the Emerson quote above, then every one of us could use a coach. In spite of the difficulty in finding hard data supporting the efficacy of executive coaching, most everyone who has ever had a coach swears by the experience.

"I combine my emotional intelligence, experience and understanding of business with [good] coaching, and the result is magic," says Tom Walter, a serial entrepreneur and founding partner of Tasty Catering, an award-winning Chicago-area corporate catering and events planning company.

The way Walter sees it, the more he taps external and internal coaching resources, the better. To that end, Walter engages in several different networks for ideas, feedback and advice -- from his millennial staffers who help him tap into current market shifts, to his independent group of nine advisors, to his membership in several associations, as well as a peer mentor group, among others. "I rarely override them, because their ideas are about what's good for business -- a solid financial basis, strong market share, et cetera," says Walter. 

Not surprisingly, entrepreneurs aren't always the easiest coaching candidates. And yet, "Ask pretty much any executive, and they'll likely be able to tell you things they would like to improve about themselves and/or their company in a heartbeat," says Michele Michaelis, chief executive officer of IvySage Education LLC, an online interactive tutoring service. "Most of us also realize that we probably have blind spots -- areas for improvement that we are not even aware of," says Michaelis.

Indeed, the requirement of a leader to become more self-aware happens as a company grows and the entrepreneur needs to delegate and depend on other people. At that point, "It becomes critical to understand who I am, what I do best, what I don't do well," says Robert Holland, Ph.D., chairman and CEO of Vistage Michigan, an executive coaching and peer-to-peer advisory group organization.

"When I share [that information] with a coach, two of us are working on the problem rather than one," he says. A coach also helps give leaders a balanced view of their performance, and helps them develop clear professional development goals. But just what does it take to be coachable? How do you get started?

"Once you've worked with a coach and trust her, ask her to address any other issues that she sees -- what are your blind spots and how might they be holding you back?" says Michaelis.

Keep in mind that while you should listen carefully and consider ideas with an open mind, if the rationale for an idea doesn't make sense, always trust your instincts.