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Tipping While Traveling: Whom to Tip and How Much

December 27, 2013
URL: http://www.entrepreneur.com/article/230382

The rules of tipping can be complicated – particularly when you're on the road. Almost everyone knows to tip 15 to 20 percent of the bill for restaurant servers, but the rules are hardly as clear when it comes to hotel staff, shuttle drivers and other people who help you along your trip.

The guidelines below are an excellent starting point, but the list is by no means exhaustive. When you receive exceptional service while traveling, consider tipping as a means to show your appreciation. Anytime someone handles your luggage for you and the bags are unusually heavy or large, tip extra. The amount of a tip can vary greatly so it's a good idea to carry small bills with you while you travel to avoid the hassle of getting change.

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It's important to note that the guidelines below apply in the U.S. only. If you're going on an international business trip, research the tipping guidelines for the country you'll be visiting. A tip of 20 percent would be extravagant for someone who works in a European restaurant; most diners leave the change left over from the bill (generally no more than five or ten percent). In some countries, tipping isn't customary. In Australia, for example, servers make a higher wage so tipping isn't expected. In places like this, you’ll want to show your appreciation through kind words and a smile.

Here's some advice if you're traveling domestically.

Airports

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Hotels

Restaurants

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