Click to Print

Creating a Great Business Card

Success is in the cards when you've got business cards that convey the right message.
February 19, 2006
URL: http://www.entrepreneur.com/article/71900

A business card is an integral part of any good marketing plan. For its size and cost, it's probably the most powerful part. Of course, you can't expect your business card to tell the whole story about your company. What you should expect it to do is present a professional image people will remember. A business card can make or break a client's first impression of your company. In fact, this little card makes as much of an impression as your personal appearance-the suit you wear or the briefcase you carry.

Choose a card style that's appropriate for your business, industry and personal style. If you're a funeral director, for example, you don't want to be caught handing out day-glow cards with cartoon figures on them. If you're a mechanic whose specialty is converting old Beetles into dune buggies, a formal, black-on-white engraved card will probably be dropped into the nearest circular file. When crafting a design, start with the style that best supports the business image you wish to project. To help you get started, here are five different card styles for you to consider:

Now It's Time to Order

Once you've settled on a basic idea for your business card, it's time to head to the printer. There are four primary considerations when ordering business cards:

Design Resource

For more detailed descriptions of the different types of business cards, take a look at It's in the Cards. In it, Ivan Misner, Candace Bailly and Dan Georgevich review more than 2,000 business cards from 10 countries and select more than 200 examples of some of the best, which are shown throughout the book in full-color.

One Final Tip

Though this may sound like obvious advice, it might cost you another trip to the printer if you don't heed it: Include the essentials. This means your name, title, company name, address, phone number (or numbers, if you want to include your cell), e-mail and Web site. If someone wants to contact you after receiving your card, you sure as heck want them to be able to.

Compiled from articles written by Kim T. Gordon and Ivan Misner previously published on Entrepreneur.com.