How Can I Dissolve an S Corporation?

min read
Opinions expressed by Entrepreneur contributors are their own.
Your rights as a minority shareholder depend on whether you have a written shareholders agreement and, if not, the default provisions contained in your state corporate law.

Sometimes, shareholders agreements will include terms that explicitly don't require shareholders to invest additional capital.

However, if the other shareholders choose to put in more capital, your ownership can be diluted. Or, if you refuse to contribute more, the other shareholders can buy you out.

If your other partners are determined to keep the company going and you want to leave, you may want to consider making a proposal that they buy out your interest-- rather than forcing the company to dissolve -- so that at least you can leave the sinking ship, even if they choose not to.

An attorney can help you explore the options and craft the proposal.
More from Entrepreneur
Our Franchise Advisors will guide you through the entire franchising process, for FREE!
  1. Book a one-on-one session with a Franchise Advisor
  2. Take a survey about your needs & goals
  3. Find your ideal franchise
  4. Learn about that franchise
  5. Meet the franchisor
  6. Receive the best business resources

SAVE on an Entrepreneur Insider Membership

Use code SAVE20 through 9/6/21 to become an annual member for just $49/yr $39/yr. When you do, you’ll enjoy:
  • Full access to Entrepreneur.com, including premium content
  • An ad-free experience
  • A weekly newsletter
  • A 1-year Entrepreneur magazine subscription delivered directly to you
Whether you want to learn something new, be more productive, or make more money, the Entrepreneur Store has something for everyone:
  • Software
  • Gadgets
  • Online Courses
  • Travel Essentials
  • Housewares
  • Fitness & Health Devices
  • And More

Latest on Entrepreneur