Mad About Banks?

Don't pull your hair out. Read this instead.
Magazine Contributor
1 min read

This story appears in the June 1998 . Subscribe »

I hate my banker!" If you've ever thought or uttered those words, then there's a book you should read.

Brad Kuhn, co-author with former banker Ryan Tennyson of I Hate My Banker (Sterling Financial Group), found the inspiration for his book while reporting on the savings and loan crisis and the banking and credit crunch.

"People who'd been in business for a long time were baffled by the changes in how bankers dealt with them," says Kuhn. "Small-business people remember when banking was done on a handshake, but the S & L crisis and the [subsequent] regulatory backlash changed the landscape," says Kuhn.

The book features solutions to 10 problematic scenarios related to borrowing transactions. It also explains the forces shaping current banking practices--which should help you navigate these sometimes tumultuous waters.

Contact Sources

Sterling Financial Group, (407) 292-9404, fax: (407) 292-9206

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