Apple Hit with iTunes Lawsuit

What would a week in the tech-world be without another questionable lawsuit against Apple?
2 min read
Brought to you by PCWorld

What would a week in the tech-world be without another questionable lawsuit against Apple? Apple is already facing a lawsuit for dropping the price of the iPhone and another one filed on the behalf of someone who iBricked his iPhone and is mad.

This time around Apple is being sued by a Florida resident Frederick Black who filed a class-action lawsuit against Apple, claiming the company is attempting to establish a monopoly over the digital media market by "illegally" tying iPods to the iTunes Store.

According to Apple Insider, Black asserts, among many things, that Apple acts unlawfully in not letting its consumers transfer iTunes-purchased content to a non-iPod device or transfer other online vendors' content to their iPods. Also, if consumers happen to lose or break their iPod, the lawsuit asserts users are unable to transfer songs purchased through iTunes to a non-Apple device and have to repurchase an iPod as a result.

There are so many things troubling about this case I don't know where to start. First did someone forget to tell Black about how to add DRM-free files to iTunes that are purchased from online music stores like Amazon music download service or eMusic? ITunes also allows anyone to buy iTunes Plus tracks with no DRM that can be played on any device.

Also, if you feel your Apple iTunes' library is imprisoned by iTunes software there are ways to convert Apple AAC files. There are several programs such as AppleMacSoftware DRM Converter for Mac, Magic AAC to MP3 Converter, and MP3&WAV Converter that will get the job done.

A few years back PC World wrote about how to beat the music download blues which gives some great tips on how frustrated folks can solve their music download problems without getting their attorney involved.

The case, which was filed in Florida district court in August, has made it to the US District Court for the Southern District of California. Black is seeking in excess of $15,000 in damages, even up to $45,000 for attorneys' fees, damages and any further relief.

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