Doubts That Kill the Deal and How to Overcome Them

Doubts That Kill the Deal and How to Overcome Them
Image credit: Dave Hosford | Flickr
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“What’s your budget?” you ask. Silence occupies the room a moment.

“I don’t know,” says the client. “What do you charge?”

Related: 4 Ways to Overcome Self-Doubt

Trying to figure out what to say -- or not say -- to a myriad of personalities can cause doubt to creep into even the most confident businessperson. Everyone has doubts, of course. But how you deal with those doubts determines whether you win the deal and bring home the bacon. 

Entrepreneurs like you can’t afford to allow past failures, personal issues and lack of confidence to become barriers to your success.

Not that you haven't tried. Perhaps you've already considered strategies for overcoming personal pain and fear. ” You’ve been told to do what you fear, to not compare yourself to others and to not let failure stop you. Yet you’re still left wondering: "Why do I have that sinking feeling inside?"

What ilks entrepreneurs? 

I am a self-esteem and branding expert who has coached hundreds of entrepreneurs, and the top two burning concerns I've seen that cause entrepreneurs to doubt themselves and lose opportunities are (1) their lack of clarity of purpose and (2) their need to be liked and accepted.

What lies at the core of these doubts? Unasked and unanswered questions.

Related: 12 Signs You Have an Entrepreneurial Mindset

No one says, “Please help me. I’m not likeable.” What they say is, “Was that okay?” “Is that what you’re looking for?” or “How does that sound?”

All these questions reflect self-doubt and insecurities. Certainly, no one, not even a coach, can tell you what your truth is. What you can come to understand, however, is the path to that truth. So, as you walk that path to greater confidence and contributions to the marketplace, consider how you can surmount the following common obstacles.

1. Identify internal barriers.

Doubts come from past experiences. They show up as relevant information needed for the present moment. History isn’t meant to hinder success; it’s meant to help a person prevail. In many situations, the information is no longer relevant. The ability to take decisive action comes through learning from the past and leaping courageously into the future.

2. Notice when doubt shows up.

Take notice when doubt shows up and ask, “Where did you come from? Why are you here? What’s being expected of me that is making me question my ability to deliver?”

3. Listen.

Nervous talk can kill the deal and shake confidence. People are busy and don’t have time to listen to unsolicited chatter. Constant talking reveals nervousness and uncertainty. Seek to understand the potential client’s needs and greatest concerns and align what you do with those needs. Let the potential client lead the conversation. Remember: The one who is listening is the one who holds the power.

4. Know your purpose and the value of it.

Pricing is tricky. And getting a client to share his or her budget may be nearly impossible. This alone can cause a person to retreat in disappointment and start to wonder about you. Therefore, understanding your value proposition and how to communicate it is essential for success.

5. Uncovering your life’s purpose isn’t easy.

Stringing together the right words to communicate what you do and the value that it brings to others is just as difficult. The uncertainty with both can leave a person dangling. Confusion creates doubt. Clarity increases confidence.

To get clear on your mission, tell yourself: “I come into your presence so that I can increase your confidence, income and influence.'” Another statement that may help you get clear is, “I am the gateway to 'increased self-esteem.'” 

Once you can communicate in no uncertain terms your risk-versus-reward ratio, your confidence will surge.

6. Know what constitutes success.

Success doesn’t always mean signing a contract. It may just mean the start of a trusted relationship. So, set clear intentions and never doubt that you are good enough.

Related: 10 Mindsets That Will Radically Improve Your Business