Do You Copy?

Still trying to get by with an old black-and-white copier? Technicolor creates copy in a whole new light.
Magazine Contributor
1 min read

This story appears in the July 1999 issue of . Subscribe »

If you're on a first-name basis with your local Kinko's employees, maybe it's time to consider a color copier of your own. For a street price of $499, Hewlett-Packard provides the digital HP Color Copier 170. It creates photo-quality color images as well as crisp black and whites. The digital technology makes a lot of higher-end features possible, such as reduction and enlargement from 25 percent to 400 percent, reverse-image for iron-ons, auto-fit and cloning.

At about 19 inches wide and 17 inches deep, it's probably not much bigger than your printer. If you want to tackle creating your own brochures, sales literature or promotional T-shirts, the HP Color Copier could be a convenient solution. But don't forget to factor in the ongoing costs of ownership: premium papers and ink cartridges. More information is available at www.hp.com.

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