My Queue

There are no Videos in your queue.

Click on the Add to next to any video to save to your queue.

There are no Articles in your queue.

Click on the Add to next to any article to save to your queue.

There are no Podcasts in your queue.

Click on the Add to next to any podcast episode to save to your queue.

You're not following any authors.

Click the Follow button on any author page to keep up with the latest content from your favorite authors.

Repetitive Stress

Don't risk any injuries while working.
2 min read
Opinions expressed by Entrepreneur contributors are their own.

Just when you thought we were done . . . yep, we gotta bring it up: repetitive stress injuries.
You might not have carpal tunnel syndrome; you might not even wince once from staring at your computer screen or remaining glued to an uncomfortable chair all day.

But as with unhealthy nutrition and fitness behaviors, repetitive stress can catch up with you and leave you with chronic pain. New Milford, New Jersey, ergonomics firm ErgAerobics Inc. recommends evaluating these elements of your work station:

1.Desk. It should have rounded edges and be large enough to accommodate your keyboard, mouse, monitor and any documents you're working on.

2. Monitor. It should be at or below eye level, an arm's length away from you, and positioned so that it's not directly beneath any overhead lights.

3. Keyboard and mouse. Get wrist rests and, if possible, a split keyboard.

4. Chair. A good one will have adjustable back and seat cushions and padded arm rests, lumbar support, the ability to swivel and five wheels, and provide adequate space beneath the chair and the desk.

5. Your body position. Your arms should be positioned on the armrests or resting on your desk, with your feet resting on the floor or on a footrest. Keep your lower back slightly arched with the help of a lumbar support cushion.
Remember, too, that you should take breaks at least once or twice an hour to stretch and give your eyes a rest.

6 Years After 'Shark Tank,' This Lobster Roll Food Truck Clawed Its Way Into a Multi-Million Dollar Business