How to Obtain Government Grant Funding in Manufacturing

There are over 200 national incentives for the industrialisation of South Africa. Can you tap into grant funding to grow your business?
How to Obtain Government Grant Funding in Manufacturing
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Director of Strategy and Finance at Uzenzele Holdings
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Many people ask me why the focus of public investment in SMEs and business is so heavily weighted on the manufacturing sector?

The reality is that investment in industrialisation results in a multiplier effect in jobs, foreign earnings through exports and increased tax revenues. Countries that focus on industrialisation have proven its potential to stimulate economic growth and address social challenges.

If you’re looking for opportunities and the support needed to realise these opportunities, manufacturing is a good place to start. The Department of Trade and Industry (DTI) offers several manufacturing-based incentives and grants.

Below are the ten key general principles associated with the DTI incentives:

1. Matching concept: DTI grants are based on a ‘matching’ or ‘co-funding’ principle, which requires an applicant to invest a portion of the funds required for the project for which funding is being requested.

The DTI will fund a portion of the project qualifying costs (anywhere from 10% to 90% depending on the specific fund) on condition that the applicant can prove a source of the remaining portion. The source of the difference can be debt, equity or any other form of funding.

2. Qualifying/allowable investments or activities: The DTI sets rules for what can be funded by way of a grant (qualifying costs). These may differ based on the incentive, but the general rule is that the main application of grant funding is for plant, machinery, tools and equipment. Land and working capital will not qualify and would form part of the co-funding.

3. Project size: This refers to the full project size and includes all costs involved in implementing the project. All costs include capital expenditure (e.g. plant, machinery, tools and equipment), working capital (e.g. salaries, wages, stock etc.) and other costs including, but not limited to, land, vehicles, business development and certifications.Not all costs will qualify for funding from an incentive.

4. Bankability: Projects are evaluated to determine their bankability. The DTI aims to ensure that the principles applied in an application and business plan are realistic and will result in a sustainable business and/or project.

In evaluating bankability, the DTI will look at the ability and know-how of the team and will require the applicant to show proof of market. Proof of market is demonstrated by offtake agreements, purchase orders, contracts or letters of intent.

5. Timelines: Incentives are strategic funding and, as such, are not an appropriate source of funding for distressed businesses or businesses with short timeframes. This funding should be viewed as strategic funding.

The DTI may provide timelines for processing applications, however, applicants must be prepared for timelines longer than those indicated. Applications may take anywhere from three to 12 months to be processed and approved.

6. Approval prior to investing: Investments made prior to the approval of an application will be non-qualifying investments. This means that an investment made before receipt of an approval from the DTI cannot be recuperated. This will be enforceable even if the investment made formed part of an application that was approved.

7. Milestone based claims: The DTI will make payments based on project milestones as indicated in an application. Each fund may define its own milestone parameters.

8. Rebated claims: Claims are rebated to applicants. This means that an applicant must first invest, in line with its application, and then submit a claim for the approved investment. This principle demonstrates the importance of securing co-funding, which will be used to initiate the project.

9. Tax free grants: Grants awarded and paid are tax-free.

10. Equity substitution in nature: As grants are not repayable, they can be considered equity for purposes of securing debt. Most debt funders require a portion of equity from an applicant to lower the risk of debt.

Debt financiers will consider a grant as an equity contribution, allowing applicants to unlock debt that would otherwise not have been available. 

 

 

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