Giving Credit

New cards make life easier for your business and customers.
Magazine Contributor
1 min read

This story appears in the January 2001 . Subscribe »

Love the idea of a credit card embossed with your company's name, but don't like annual fees? Well, Citi-group's CitiBusiness Platinum Select (www.citibusiness.citibank.com) charges no annual fees and offers up to 25 cards per account. In addition to business discounts and free quarterly and annual summaries, CitiBusiness has an "Ask the Experts" service to answer entrepreneurs' questions about their burgeoning businesses.

Another new card, Visa Buxx (www.visabuxx.com), gives retailers further entree into the teen market, which Visa says is $150 billion plus and growing. How it works: Parents put money into accounts to be accessed by payment cards, and are notified by e-mail each time the cards are used. Friends and relatives can give gifts by putting money in the accounts as well.


C.J. Prince is a New York City writer who specializes in business topics and the executive editor of Chief Executive magazine.

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