Certifiable

What all those fancy-schmancy tech certificates really mean
Magazine Contributor
1 min read

This story appears in the January 2001 issue of . Subscribe »

All the different technology certifications out there can make even a tech-savvy entrepreneur dizzy. According to Gary Clark of Galton Technologies, a Provo, Utah, firm that helps companies build certification programs, there are about 200 software and hardware vendor certification programs today.

But Clark aims to help. Galton Technologies offers a free publication, Building Certification Programs Planning Guide, which explains certification programs and what certified employees learn. Clark advises employers to look for certifications from established vendors. "Good programs establish a firm foundation for the jobs they're certifying," he says. "A certification is more than just a piece of paper. It's a validation of somebody's ability to work and [provide] IT solutions."


Ellen Paris is a Washington, DC, writer and former Forbes magazine staff writer.


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