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Do not publish your vaccination certificate! Identity data can be stolen

In social networks, many older adults have shared their certificate to celebrate their immunization. There are 6 other ways to party safely.

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This article was translated from our Spanish edition. Opinions expressed by Entrepreneur contributors are their own.

As the distribution of COVID-19 vaccines increases , more and more people are posting photos of their vaccination certificates on social media to celebrate being immunized. However, sharing this data can expose you to fraud and identity theft.

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"Posting photos of the vaccination certificate may seem like a way to celebrate an important milestone in approaching the end of last year's difficult experiences in the pandemic," said Christopher Budd, senior manager of global threat communications at Avast in a statement. . “It may also seem like a good way to encourage other people who might be 'vaccine negative' or indecisive. But taking a photo of your actual certificate and posting it is not the best way to accomplish these things and can increase the risks around identity theft. Full name and date of birth are potentially sufficient for someone to attempt to initiate an identity theft attempt against us, especially if they can combine it with other personal information that may be publicly available through public records and / or social media. Also, specific information about the vaccine, the vaccination date and who administered it could allow someone to try to gain access to personal health information by posing as the person by calling 'to verify' something. "

Don't make it easy for thieves

To be honest, all the information that appears on your vaccination certificate can be found in various parts of the internet, there is no need to make it easier for identity thieves. Of course, we all want to celebrate vaccination and inspire others to get their fix, but there are ways to do it without compromising your safety. Avast shares seven ways to do it safely:

1. Take a photo of the vaccination itself: Take a photo while the healthcare professional is injecting you, with their permission, of course. Post it on Facebook ; share it on your Instagram Stories; Tweet it, whatever, put it on the net.

2. Take a selfie with your band-aid: Wait until you get home, put on something cute, and take a selfie with your band-aid and a little caption.

3. Take a picture of yourself outside the vaccination site: If you are going to get vaccinated at a clinic, ask someone to take a picture of you right outside. So, you are fulfilling the double function of making known the places in your area that are doing this important work.

4. Post a video of yourself dancing: We don't judge how you celebrate! We've all been in our homes for over a year and it's time to get that energy out.

5. Hide all personal information: If you really want to share your vaccination certificate and you simply believe that there is no other way to express your joy on the networks, cover all the pertinent information with one finger. Don't just scribble, as they can be removed with a little image handling knowledge (though it's best not to post at all).

6. Opt for text only: For those who are feeling especially excited, nothing says "feelings" like white text on a black background. Share your feelings! After all, we are dealing with a pandemic.