The Facts About Bonding

We'll help you figure out if your company should be bonded.
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Sometimes confused with insurance, bonding is a guarantee of performance required for any business, either by law or by consumer demand. The most common businesses that bond employees are general contractors, temporary personnel agencies, janitorial companies and companies with government contracts. Bonding helps ensure that the job is performed and that the customer is protected against losses from theft or damage done by your employees.

Although you still have to pay claims if your employees are bonded, bonding has the side benefit of making your business more desirable to customers. They know that if they suffer a loss as the result of your work, they can recover the damages from the bonding company. The difference between a bond and insurance is that a bonding company ensures your payment by requiring security or collateral if a claim is made against you.

Excerpted from Start Your Own Business: The Only Start-Up Guide You'll Ever Need

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