Top Trending: Why You Should Never Follow Your Passion

On the Road Again

Phone home with your old cell--at a price.
  • ---Shares
This story appears in the October 2002 issue of Entrepreneur. Subscribe »
Reader Resource

Apply now to be an Entrepreneur 360™ company. Let us tell the world your success story. Get Started »

If you've ever tried using your cell phone beyond U.S. borders, you know that our mixed bag of protocols makes it incompatible with most international networks. You could pick up phones and prepaid packages in destination countries, but you'd have to send business contacts your new number.

SIM cards let you keep your U.S. phone-at least, GSM models. These tiny cards slip into the battery compartment and let you use your regular mobile number. Nextel subscribers can be reached in 80 countries using the company's i2000 GSM phone ($225 street). SIM cards are free, but calls run from $0.29 to $4.99 per minute. AT&T customers pay $1.50 per minute across 120 countries, but are charged an extra $7.99 month. AT&T phones cost $80 to $200, plus $25 for a SIM card.

If you can do without your U.S. mobile number, you can make outgoing calls on your GSM phone at local rates. When you arrive at your destination, pick up a SIM card (about $25) and prepaid minutes. You'll need an access code from your U.S. provider. But cards can be reused during your next visit.


San Francisco-based Erik P. Nelson is a frequent contributor to Entrepreneur.

Contact Source

Edition: May 2017

Get the Magazine

Limited-Time Offer: 1 Year Print + Digital Edition and 2 Gifts only $9.99
Subscribe Now
OK

This website uses cookies to allow us to see how our website and related online services are being used. By continuing to use this website, you consent to our cookie collection. More information about how we collect cookies is found here.