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Jason Feifer

Jason Feifer

Entrepreneur Staff
Editor-in-Chief
Entrepreneur | Ask an Expert
Talk with Jason Feifer now!
Jason has worked across many media brands and mediums. He is currently editor in chief Entrepreneur magazine and hosts the podcasts Problem Solvers and Pessimists Archive. A novel he wrote with his wife, Mr. Nice Guy, comes out this fall from St. Martin’s Press. He has been an editor at Fast Company, Men’s Health, Maxim, and Boston, and written for the Washington Post, New York Times, Slate, New York magazine, and others. Please note: Mentor sessions with Entrepreneur staff are designed to share perspectives and advice, not to pitch stories for coverage. Pitches can always simply be emailed to an individual.

60-minute session

$200

Take a deep dive to learn big picture strategies and precision planning to help you achieve your goals.

30-minute session

$125

A power-packed conversation aimed at getting you efficient and effective solutions.

About Jason Feifer

Jason Feifer is the editor-in-chief of Entrepreneur magazine, and the host of two podcasts: Problem Solvers, about entrepreneurs solving unexpected problems in their business, and Pessimists Archive  a history of unfounded fears of innovation. He’s @heyfeifer on Twitter and Instagram.

Areas of Expertise

Storytelling
Motivation
Writing
Public Speaking
Personal Branding
Pitching Your Business to Media
Podcasting

More From Jason Feifer

Ready For Anything

To Succeed, Just Follow This Six-Step Plan

Stuck trying to figure out what's next? Just start moving.
Problem Solvers

Should You Compete With (and Potentially Kill) Your Own Business?

Adam Schwartz's t-shirt company was struggling. Instead of saving it, he built something new -- and better.

How This Cannabis Brand Designed a Modern Product With Nostalgic Packaging

Antique apothecary bottles served as inspiration as founders created a brand that feels more artisanal than mass.
Editor's Note

The Best Way To Get What You Want? Focus On Your Customers' Needs.

Forget your own desires, and lead with the value you can provide.
Ready For Anything

10 Inspirational Quotes to Keep You Going Through Hard Times

Post them on your wall for when you need a pick-me-up.
Problem Solvers

SimpliSafe Chased the Wrong Customer. This Pivot Saved The Business.

SimpliSafe is a security system built for renters. But it unexpectedly gained traction with homeowners.
Starting a Business

The Best Employees Have Side Hustles -- Here's Why

How does an entrepreneur get started? By busting out of someone else's box.

What Cannabis Businesses Can Learn from the Sex-Toy Industry

Social media won't accept advertising from either industry. Here's the work-around.
Editor's Note

Every Entrepreneur Has Imposter Syndrome. Here's Why We Need to Talk About It.

Everyone feels the same way, but no one will admit it. Let's break the stalemate.
Ready For Anything

What Seth Godin Wants You To Know About Marketing in 2019

The Industry expert urges companies to be relevant, not loud.
Hiring

After Realizing He'd Hired All the Wrong People, This Food Startup Founder Hit Reset

JUST co-founder Josh Tetrick wanted to build a disruptive company, so he hired disruptive employees. Then he got disrupted himself.
Lying

Should Entrepreneurs Lie? It's a Tricky Question.

In the hustle of the startup world, entrepreneurs often drop little white lies -- and don't even consider them to be lies. Where's the ethical line?
Ready For Anything

Lululemon Founder Chip Wilson Had a Falling Out With His Brand. Now He Wants Back In.

Entrepreneurs pour their hearts and souls into their businesses. Is there ever a good -- or easy -- time to walk away?