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Leadership / Daniel Lubetzky

Having an Ego Is Healthy. Letting It Get Between You and Your Co-Workers Is Not.

Senior Entrepreneurship Writer at CNBC
3 min read

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Entrepreneurs are often driven to succeed by their egos. That’s normal.

But when it comes time for an entrepreneur to build a team, having a ego can sometimes get in the way, says Daniel Lubetzky, the founder of KIND, in an interview at the Entrepreneur 360 conference in New York City.

Lubetzky launched KIND in 2004, and today, the healthy-snack company has about 300 full-time employees and has sold one billion bars.

Related: Unlikely Lessons From Building a Multi-Million Dollar Social Business

While competitive thoughts may instinctively come up for entrepreneurs, it’s important to recognize when your ego is pushing you to achieve and when your ego is getting in the way.

“It’s very natural and very normal that, as you are attracting people, sometimes when someone is excellent or great, you compete with them,” Lubetzky says. “It’s normal for that thought to come. It’s not normal for us to embrace that thought.”

To hear more from Lubetzky about how entrepreneurs learn to navigate their own egos, watch the video above.

Related: 5 Business Lessons from KIND Founder and CEO Daniel Lubetzky