who-you-are.jpg If you're an entrepreneur--whether you're working solo or with employees who share the load--time is your most valuable commodity. There simply aren't enough hours in the day to stay ahead on the job, let alone have a personal life. The answer isn't to work harder--chances are, you're already putting in 50 to 60 hours a week--but to work smarter. And that means doing what you do in a more productive way.

We're going to show you how.

Starting today, Entrepreneur presents 200 Ways To Be More Productive in Life ... and in Business--a nine-week challenge aimed at getting your business to run more effectively and efficiently, and at giving you more time for life outside of work, too.

We've gathered a panel of experts to offer 200 concrete, real-world pieces of advice, and we've focused on the areas that you've told us are the most critical "pain points": Time management, technology, mobile technology, money, leadership, work space and work/life issues. Each day you'll get a few more tips--challenges, if you will--sent to your e-mail, RSS feed or Twitter account. You can also find them posted right here on our website or on Entrepreneur.com's Facebook page.

All you have to do is make some honest assessments about yourself and your workstyle and be committed to putting new energy into the places that need it. Yes, this will take some time and attention. But, we promise, it will be worth it.

How will you know? Today's challenge--know who you are and know what you want--includes a short quiz. Answer the questions and hang on to them: These are your goals for the next nine weeks. At the end of our program, we'll look at how far we've come together. Now, let's get started.

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Know Who You Are And Know What You Want

Entrepreneurs are notorious for a "ready, fire, aim" approach to business. As a result, they often end up misfits in their own ventures because they simply let the vagaries of their business define them, rather than making sure their business serves their motivations, talents, personality and desires.
So before you set your sights on specific productivity goals, give some thought to what you're good at and what you're not, what energizes you and what drags you down and what you want out of your business and what you don't.

Ready, aim, fire.