Cause and Effect

A lean fundraising machine puts money where Billy Starr wants it: fighting cancer.
Magazine Contributor
1 min read

This story appears in the January 2007 issue of Entrepreneur. Subscribe »

A star in the world of big-dollar fund-raising, Billy Starr founded the Pan-Massachusetts Challenge bike-a-thon with one goal: to raise money for the Jimmy Fund of the Dana-Farber Cancer Institute in Boston. His entrepreneurial spirit took root after his mother died of melanoma in 1974.
As one of the most successful athletic fundraisers in the U.S., PMC has grown from 36 riders raising $10,200 in 1980 to 4,300 cyclists raising $26 million--half the Jimmy Fund's annual revenue--today. Ninety-nine cents of every rider-dollar raised goes to the fund. Starr accomplishes this by running a lean operation: He keeps his staff to a minimum, uses credit card pledges to ensure fundraising commitments are met on time and maintains a slim operating budget of $2.5 million generated largely by corporate sponsorships and merchandising. "Every year, we have grown," says Starr, 54. "I run the PMC with one thing in mind: making money for the fund."

loading...
More from Entrepreneur
Our Franchise Advisors will guide you through the entire franchising process, for FREE!
  1. Book a one-on-one session with a Franchise Advisor
  2. Take a survey about your needs & goals
  3. Find your ideal franchise
  4. Learn about that franchise
  5. Meet the franchisor
  6. Receive the best business resources
Entrepreneur Insider members enjoy exclusive access to business resources for just $5/mo:
  • Premium articles, videos, and webinars
  • An ad-free experience
  • A weekly newsletter
  • Bonus: A FREE 1-year Entrepreneur magazine subscription delivered directly to you
Discover a better way to hire freelancers. From business to marketing, sales, finance, design, technology, and more, we have the freelancers you need to tackle your most important work and projects, on-demand.

Latest on Entrepreneur