Martial Arts

Startup Costs: $10,000 - $50,000
Franchises Available? Yes
Online Operation? No

Martial arts as a sport is second only to golf in terms of number of new participants over the past decade. Typically, a martial arts school will focus on one particular type of training such as kung fu or kick boxing. A martial arts school can be an expensive new business venture to set in motion. However, the average cost now paid by a student per year for martial arts training is in excess of $600. Providing the business could train 200 students per year, this would result in revenues exceeding $120,000, based on an average of $600 per year per student. Needless to say, this type of specialized instruction can be very financially lucrative. In addition to group training, one-on-one martial arts training is also becoming popular for the serious student who is prepared to pay $40 per hour or more for an intensive training session.

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