We know that getting enough sleep makes you healthier and cuts down on stress, but according to a recent study from Harvard University and the University of Utah, how much energy you have can affect how ethically you act.

The study found that, on average, people are more likely to lie in the afternoon (3 p.m. to 6 p.m.) than in the morning as the day's stresses wear on their self-control. "Gradually increasing fatigue from unremarkable activities can lead to systemic moral failure," wrote Maryam Kouchaki of Harvard, who co-authored the study. People who usually behave more ethically were the most susceptible to the negative consequences of that resource drain, she added.

Related: Surprising Tricks: How to Sleep on a Plane

Taking the conceit a bit further, professors from the University of Washington, Johns Hopkins University and Georgetown University then found that that morning people were more likely to be dishonest and cheat in the evening, whereas night owls were apt to do the same in the morning. 

So, what does that mean for making decisions in the workplace? Being aware of when you have the most energy can not only help you and your co-workers organize your time effectively, but keep you on the right side of the morality line, from dealings with clients to making a new pot of coffee if you’re the last one to finish it.  

Tell Us: When do you have the most energy during the day?  Is the data from the study in line with your workplace experience?

Related: 5 Things To Do Before Bed That Will Jump Start Tomorrow