Any millennial who’s ever undertaken the nail-biting chore of explaining technology to an elderly relative may soon sing the praises of a brand new tablet developed by the American Association of Retired Persons (AARP).

The nonprofit organization and advocate for baby boomers has just launched its RealPad -- the very first tablet, it says, specifically designed for technologically-illiterate users aged 50 and up.

Created in conjunction with Intel, the modified Android device is priced at $189 and features a 7.85-inch screen and 16GB of memory. It is WiFi-equipped and also has front- and rear-facing cameras.

And for those to whom an iPad may be too complex to maneuver, the RealPad boasts a pared-down interface, larger-than-normal icons and special settings to fix common mishaps instantly, the AARP said in a press release.

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It also comes equipped with toll-free customer service access -- available around the clock -- as well as built-in video tutorials on subjects as varied as touchscreen basics, how to download apps, how to browse the Internet and how to set up video calling and email accounts.

While gadgets are often a source of “complexity, frustration and headaches” for the nation’s 76 million baby boomers, said AARP chief JoAnn Jenkins in a statement, the RealPad aims to help them embrace “the benefits of technology such as connecting with family, friends, communities and enjoying books, games and learning.”

The device is available for pre-order via Wal-mart today, with shipments slated for mid-October. Its $189 price tag also includes a complementary one-year membership to the AARP, which comprises coupons and other discounts, a subscription to AARP magazine and important healthcare tools.

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