Join the League of Extraordinary Bosses: 4 Habits to Cultivate

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As most employers grapple with low employee engagement, many workplace observers wonder just how the downward spiral begins.

Sometimes the low level of employee engagement is triggered by poor pervading the entire company. This can be overcome, however, if leaders come to understand what makes an effective boss.

The most effective managers are those who value transparency, practice two-way communication, provide constructive feedback and above and beyond to serve their employees.

Take a look at one of 's most effective leaders, Mark Zuckerberg. The CEO believes not only in his company and product but also his employees. He listens to his employees, values transparency and builds relationships.

Good bosses also ensure that staffers have the resources and guidance needed to accomplish their goals.  

To become a highly effective boss, embrace the following four habits:

Related: Trust, Fairness, Respect: Qualities of a Good Boss and a Great Leader (Infographic)

1. Focus on improvement. Although it's tempting to only scrutinize the numbers when measuring a company's progress, qualitative matters count. Look at how employees try to boost their efficiency or learn from past mistakes.

Creating successful employees involves managing them as people, not as numbers or assets. The level of sales a department brings in doesn't necessarily reflect all the work employees do and their efforts. 

2. Be available to employees. Don't just tell employees what to do; be approachable when employees need help. Promote transparent communication and position as a resource to employees.

Welcome employee feedback and encourage staffers to ask questions. Demonstrate that employees' queries and comments are listened to.  

Related: What Separates a Great Leader From a Good One?

3. Help employees accomplish their goals. Extraordinary bosses focus on the success achieved by every employee. Instead of trying to create a few rock star employees, effective bosses want each individual to achieve results.

Effective bosses also ensure that every employee sets up goals to support the company's progress as a whole. Encourage employees at every level to use their talents to help the entire team achieve more success. This way, no one is left behind and each employee can reach his or her highest potential.

4. Be a coach and supporter. Don't assume employees know how to do everything. Leadership in the workplace is about helping employees grow, improve and succeed.

Coaching employees can be effective because a boss gives real-time feedback and guidance. Research by Towers Watson shows highly engaged employees receive feedback from management regularly.

If employees are struggling in a certain area, step in and guide them. Sometimes employees can become easily overwhelmed by a new project, so don't hesitate to lend support.

Management effectiveness can determine a company's success. Great bosses make employees want to stay at their jobs, while bad ones prompt them to leave

What habits do you believe are important for effective managers?

Related: Radical Transparency Can Re-Energize a Company's Culture and Deliver Results

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