Lindred Greer

Lindred Greer


Professor, Stephen M. Ross School of Business, University of Michigan

Lindred (Lindy) Greer is an Associate Professor of Management & Organizations at Michigan Ross as well as the Faculty Director of the Sanger Leadership Center. Her research focuses on how to lead effective organizational teams, with specific interests in leadership skills in conflict management, diversity and inclusion, vision crafting, and the communication of emotions.  
 
Lindy has published in top management and psychology research outlets such as Academy of Management Journal, Organization Science, Journal of Applied Psychology, Science, and Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, among others. Her work has also been covered in well-known media outlets including the New York Times, Forbes, and Fast Company. She has received awards for her research from the Academy of Management and American Psychological Association, and she was recently named one of the Top 40 under 40 Business School Professors by Poets and Quants.    
 
Lindy is currently an Associate Editor at the Academy of Management Journal, on the boards of six of the top management and psychology journals, and has served on the boards of professional associations such as the International Association of Conflict Management and the Conflict Management Division of the Academy of Management.  
 
Lindy received her B.S. from the Wharton School of Business at the University of Pennsylvania, and her Ph.D. in social and organizational psychology from Leiden University in the Netherlands. She joined the team at Ross in 2019.  

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Latest

The Secret To Agile Teams: Three Hacks To Use Hierarchy To Accelerate Team Agility

A clear hierarchy -with a strong leader- allows teams to know when to flatten out to ideate or fall into rank to get things done quickly- and that starts to look like true agility!

Why Remote Work Makes Teams (And Leaders) Better

The silver lining of this is that these difficulties in going remote will force companies to take a more intentional approach to people dynamics than they did when operating in person, and this will only make companies more effective when in-person operations resume again.

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