Community Restaurant Guide

Startup Costs: $2,000 - $10,000
Home Based: Can be operated from home.
Part Time: Can be operated part-time.
Franchises Available? Yes
Online Operation? Yes

Starting a business that creates and publishes a monthly community restaurant guide is a very straightforward business venture to set in motion. The guide can feature information and articles about community restaurants, restaurant specials and coupons, as well as forthcoming community event information. Furthermore, the restaurant guide can be distributed throughout the community free of charge, and revenues to support the business can be gained by charging the restaurants featured in the guide an advertising fee. Additional income can also be earned by providing restaurant owners with menu printing options, as well as paper placemat advertising and printing options.

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