Sportswear

Startup Costs: $10,000 - $50,000
Home Based: Can be operated from home.
Part Time: Can be operated part-time.
Franchises Available? Yes
Online Operation? Yes

There are a few approaches that can be taken in terms of starting a sportswear business. The first is to simply retail sportswear purchased on a wholesale basis via home shopping parties, the internet and sales kiosks. The second approach is to establish a business that designs and manufactures sportswear to be sold to clothing and sporting good retailers on a wholesale basis or directly to consumers via the internet and sales kiosks located in busy malls. Both approaches to establishing the business have their pros and cons. However, the first approach is less capital intensive to start and can be operated on a part-time basis until the business can be expanded to full-time from the profits earned.

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