The METATUT: a Metaverse Inspired By King Tutankhamun

The first Egyptian city in a virtual world was developed by the Cairo-based platform TUTERA

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Instead of exploring space and robotics, what if there was a way to go back in time and explore ancient cultures? TUTERA, a bootstrapped creative community hub for designers, aims at reviving ancient Egyptian history with the help of conceptual designs. Earlier last week, the company announced its METATUT CITY. The city is said to be inspired by King Tutankhamun and is developed to mark the 100th anniversary of discovering the youngest Egyptian pharaoh's tomb.

Reuters

Why is it the first Egyptian city in the virtual world? "Because after the 100-year anniversary of the discovery of Tutankhamun's tomb, we thought of establishing a platform that enables people to visit and interact. They can interact by watching the ancient Egyptian civilization, listening to historical stories and touring the city", told Dr Somaya Bahy Eldin, Vice-president, TUTERA to Reuters, a British news agency.

On Monday, Reuters also shared a glimpse of the metaverse.

Users will be able to travel through time and space and learn about the history of civilization. The current spaces open to visitors in the metaverse are Valley of the Kings, Sun Chamber, Akhenaten Palace, and the magic melody chamber. The Akhenaten Palace will let visitors experience his journey and will be divided into four stages; Egyptian Gods Path, Transition Area, Land of No Where, and The Immortal Love Hall.

METATUT's phase I is being launched with four portals; Amarna- the Hall of the Sun, The Enchanted Melody Hall, Nefertiti Palace, and Avenue of the Kings. The company plans to open other spaces by December-end.

The metaverse can be experienced by using virtual reality headgears, through your desktops and phones. If a great civilization comes back to life and completes its architectural and cultural projects in the 21st century, what will it look like?