Gender Gap

New Data Confirms Again That Women Make Less Than Men in the Same Roles

New Data Confirms Again That Women Make Less Than Men in the Same Roles
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When it's still considered a surprise that the number-one reason young women leave their jobs is because they landed higher paying gigs, it's clear that the global conversation around equal pay for equal work is unfortunately far from over.

A recent study from job-hunting platform Glassdoor pulled from data on salaries and job titles submitted by users, examining the state of the gender pay gap in Australia, France, Germany, the United Kingdom and the United States. Glassdoor looked at the incomes reported by more than 500,000 U.S. workers and found that, on average, women earned 76 cents per dollar that men earn.

Related: Women Made Incremental Progress in Tech the Past Few Years (Infographic)

The data shows that the pay gap shrinks when it's between men and women who are around the same age and have about the same level of experience and education. But when placing a man and a woman side by side -- working in the same location, with the same job title, at the same company -- women still earned less, with female employees earning 94.6 cents of her male counterpart's dollar.

Those types of stats aren't unique to the U.S. In Australia, women earn 82.1 cents per dollar; in France, its 85.7 cents per euro; 77.5 cents per euro in Germany; and in the U.K., women earn 77.1 pence per pound.

Related: How Top Companies Aim to Close the Gender Gap in Tech

Accounting for a gender bias in the workplace, whether it is intentional or not, Glassdoor ultimately found that male-dominated fields are often the higher paying ones.

Taking it a step further, Glassdoor looked at occupations where men and women were paid more than the other, or paid the same. For example, a female computer programmer sees a 3 percent discrepancy in base pay and earns 72 cents per every dollar earned by a male counterpart. One of the areas where women earn more is social work, bringing in $1.08 for every dollar earned by men.