EHarmony doesn’t just want to find you love – now it wants to find you a job, too.

The 14-year-old dating site is expanding in December with the launch of a new service called Elevated Careers by eHarmony, MarketWatch reports.

With compatibility in mind, the company wants to match employers and employees for the long haul – no more pouring resources into finding a replacement for someone who didn't work out or having to explain a job-hopping resume.

While few details were revealed about how the career matching algorithm will work, eHarmony CEO Neil Clark Warren said some of the likely qualities that will be analyzed include conscientiousness, honesty and conflict resolution, among others.

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Warren told MarketWatch he believes the company's pivot toward the corporate world is still in line with its original premise of helping people find long-lasting love. “If people come home and they’re unhappy with their job and boss, it puts a lot of tension on a marriage.”

EHarmony currently has a member base of more than 777,000 (who have to answer 200 questions before they even get started). The company reports that it has made 600,000 marriages. Last year, a study in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences (PNAS) found the site had a divorce rate of 3.9 percent. According to the CDC, the national divorce rate is 3.6, per 1,000 people.

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The company's move into career matchmaking comes at a time when the average worker hops employers every 4.6 years and worker satisfaction appears to be at a low. Gallup's annual State of the Workplace report found that 70 percent of Americans are "not engaged" or "actively disengaged" from their workplaces.

When job seekers are often advised to cultivate relationships in their industry to find the company with the culture that's right for them, and hiring managers look for both fit and expertise, perhaps Warren's logic is somewhat on target. Whether the company will be as successful with work as it is with romance remains to be seen.

Related: Could a Great Corporate Culture Be Bad for Employees?