Floyd DCosta

Floyd DCosta

Co-founder, Block Armour

About Floyd DCosta

 

Floyd DCosta is Co-founder of Block Armour, a Mumbai- and Singapore-based startup focused on harnessing the potential of blockchain technology to counter growing cybersecurity challenges in a bold new way. Its flagship IoTArmour solution is designed explicitly to provide military-grade security for connected devices and critical infrastructure in the Internet of Things (IoT). 

More From Floyd DCosta

Blockchain

Powering Next-Gen Digital Banking Using Open Banking APIs and Blockchain Technology

Embracing emerging tools like distributed ledger technology and layering it atop the core banking systems using APIs (application program interface) will allow banks to create a robust yet agile digital platform and disrupt their own business models, instead of sitting on the sidelines watching the challengers disintermediate them
Tokenisation

How Tokenisation can Digitally Transform and Revive Stock Exchanges

Blockchain can revolutionize the stock exchange experience and enhances internal capabilities
Technology

Scaling Impact Investing Using Blockchain Technology

There are over 1,340 organizations worldwide that manage more than $500 billion in related assets
Blockchain

Taking a Venture Studio Approach to Drive Blockchain Adoption

Such a setup lets organizations and emerging startups to develop, from the ground up, multiple closely related projects, using their own ideas and resources
Blockchain

How to Protect Smart Cities From Cyber Attacks Using Blockchain

Smart city networks are ever expanding and require security solutions that can be just as scalable without compromising on quality or efficiency
Smart Cities

Making Smart Cities Effective, Cleaner and Safer

Using blockchain technology, it is possible to not only make smart cities more operationally efficient, but also cleaner and safer
Technology

Blockchain Technology can be Critical to IoT Infrastructure Security

Over 45 billion IoT devices are expected to be connected by 2021, while the cumulative cost of data breaches between 2017 and 2022 is expected to touch $8 trillion