Picking up the Pieces: Sandy's Impact on Small Businesses

The hurricane that pounded the East Coast this week was – in the words of New York City Mayor Michael Bloomberg – quite possibly "the worst storm we've ever experienced."

As the recovery process begins, millions are still without power, and New York's mass transit system, tunnels and public schools are still shut down. But how did small-business owners ride out the storm?

Here is a look at 15 businesses in the New York and New Jersey area. Some remained open, serving customer’s by candlelight, while others secured their establishments with boarded-up windows and sandbags and hoped for the best. Not all made it through – and for countless more, it will be days or weeks before normal operations resume.

Sandy's Impact on Small Business

Image credit: Photo Credit: Jessie Shaw

An unidentified store in Manhattan’s West Village advertised that they remained open despite the power outages, flooding and high winds of Hurricane Sandy.

Sandy's Impact on Small Business

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A man surveyed the remains of a flooded store in the financial district of New York on Tuesday morning.

Sandy's Impact on Small Business

Image credit: Photo credit: Colleen DeBaise

A small grocery store in New York City’s West Village was one of the few open on Tuesday, despite no power and a down tree blocking the entrance.

Sandy's Impact on Small Business

Image credit: Photo credit: Colleen DeBaise

Water damage was a common sight after the storm roared through. Bongo bar in the West Village is located on the West Side Highway, which flooded when the Hudson ran its banks. This shot, looking through the windows, shows furniture moved around and debris on the floor.

Sandy's Impact on Small Business

Image credit: Photo credit: Colleen DeBaise

The Ear Inn, one of the oldest taverns in New York, has weathered numerous storms through the decades. The nearly 200-year-old bar seems to have held up well, perhaps helped by sandbags at the doors.

Sandy's Impact on Small Business

Image credit: Photo credit: Colleen DeBaise

At iPlaza nail salon in Manhattan’s TriBeCa neighborhood, a few blocks from the flooded Hudson river, the employees were shoveling water off the floor on Tuesday morning.

Sandy's Impact on Small Business

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Customers and staff drank by candle light at a Greenwich Village restaurant that remained open during the storm.

Sandy's Impact on Small Business

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Businesses boarded up along Greenwich Avenue in Manhattan’s West Village on Monday before Sandy hit.

Sandy's Impact on Small Business

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A Modell’s sporting goods sign fell from the building in Manhattan on Tuesday morning.

Sandy's Impact on Small Business

Image credit: Photo credit: Martin Fitzpatrick/New York Times

Abingdon market in Manhattan was open and running by candle light at 11:30 am on Tuesday.

Sandy's Impact on Small Business

Image credit: Photo credit: Jake Thornberr/New York Times

C-town, a local grocery store in Brooklyn’s Park Slope, remained open despite boarded windows.

Sandy's Impact on Small Business

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A local department store in Jersey Heights, N.J., was destroyed by Hurricane Sandy.

Sandy's Impact on Small Business

Image credit: Photo credit: Michael Endy/New York Times

A grocery store shelf in Westfield, N.J., was empty ahead of the storm’s arrival at 2 p.m. on Monday.

Sandy's Impact on Small Business

Image credit: Photo credit: Caroline Chen/New York Times

On 101st Street in Manhattan, a restaurant invites customers to "endure Sandy together," on Monday morning before the storm hit.

Sandy's Impact on Small Business

Tony’s Pier Seafood Restaurant on City Island in Bronx, N.Y., burned to the ground Monday night in a three-alarm fire as the storm raged. It took nearly four hours to put the fire out due to the high winds.

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