Apple Watch

Watch Apple's Three New Smartwatch Ads

Watch Apple's Three New Smartwatch Ads
Image credit: Apple

After months of waiting, Apple's debut smartwatch is finally here. The Cupertino company has eschewed its usual bombastic launches in favour of a pre-order system that has produced excellent sales, but also widespread confusion among customers about the availability of the device.

Retail chief Angela Ahrendts acknowledged in a leaked video that staff have been "bombarded with questions" by customers as to when and where the device is actually on sale. The answer? Right now — but only online, with no official Apple Stores keeping the Watch in stock for the foreseeable future.

To mark today's launch, Apple has released three new adverts, highlighting the various ways the Apple Watch can be used by ordinary people. The ads, which we first saw on The Verge, are called "Rise," "Up," and "Us."

Rise looks at people starting their day aided by the Apple smartwatch — using it as an alarm, talking to one another, checking in to their flights, taking directions and phone calls, and of course, using it as a watch. It highlights little functionality that a customer wouldn't get on their iPhone, but presents it in a more accessible fashion.

"Up" puts the focus on its health features. We see people using timers for exercise, listening to music, and the device's health-tracking and target-setting functionality.

Also included is its "time to stand" feature that encourages the user to stand up after a period inactivity. Apple CEO Tim Cook has described sitting as the "new cancer," and according to Wired, it is now common to see Apple employees randomly standing up in meetings because their Watch told them to.

The last advert, "Us," looks closely at the human aspect of the Apple Watch and how it can help people keep in touch. Apple unveiled the Apple Watch as its "most personal device ever," and the ad explores this angle — showing off its ability to share doodles, 3D emojis and your heartbeat, as well as its uses for messaging, payments and unlocking hotel rooms.


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