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Think You Understand Proper Etiquette? Try Answering These 5 Social Quandaries.

It might be time to go back to school.
Think You Understand Proper Etiquette? Try Answering These 5 Social Quandaries.
Image credit: Joe Vaughn | Getty Images

Proper etiquette is not just something for the upper class. In fact, people around the world are seeking ways to expand their understanding, many going as far as attending classes.

Related: Business Etiquette Basics From Around the World (Infographic)

That’s where schools such as Beaumont Etiquette come in. The consultancy agency offers youth and adult courses in British, Continental Europe and American etiquette. Founded by Myka Meier in London, the company says it puts a modern twist on traditional etiquette including dining, social graces, corporate protocol and more.

Beaumont Etiquette recently made its way to the U.S., opening up shop in New York City. Partnered with the famous Plaza Hotel, the school offers a five-hour etiquette intensive for a whopping $599. There are also course options starting at $75 for adults. Unfortunately, you’ll have to be patient: classes are so popular they’re sold out until May.

Related: How to Make a Great First Impression

Not sure if you should invest in etiquette class? Meier shared with us some of the most challenging etiquette questions, along with the proper responses, of course.

See if you pass the test: Can you answer these etiquette quandaries?

  1. When introducing two people, who is introduced first? An older or a younger person?
  2. True or false: It is OK in formal dining to use a spoon to twirl spaghetti?
  3. Where do you put your briefcase while sitting at a dining table?
  4. When shaking hands, how many "pumps" are appropriate in business vs. social handshakes?
  5. What are the the conversation topics you should avoid when first meeting someone?

To find out how you did, here are the correct answers:

  1. Always first introduce the person you want to show respect to, followed by the other person. For example, “President Smith, please meet Mr. Graham.”
  2. False
  3. Under the table by your top upper left toe so it's out of the way of service staff
  4. Two in business and three socially  
  5. Politics, money, vices (drinking/smoking), sex, illness and religion