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Technology

Top #4 Failed Technologies from World's Biggest Tech Giants

Despite the buzz, some technologies fail because either people are not ready to adopt it or because it doesn't work.
Top #4 Failed Technologies from World's Biggest Tech Giants
Image credit: Pixabay
Entrepreneur Staff
Feature Writer, Entrepreneur.com
3 min read

You're reading Entrepreneur India, an international franchise of Entrepreneur Media.

It’s a fact universally acknowledged that technology makes human lives easier and convenient.  Every year we see a bunch of cool new gadgets and smartphones debuting in the market with amazing features and design that increase the competition among their rivals. Surely technology may benefit us but it can also have a negative impact on our lives. Despite the buzz, some technologies fail because either people are not ready to adopt it or because it doesn’t work.

Entrepreneur India has compiled a list of technologies that didn’t succeed. Some technologies, no matter how incredible, are mostly remembered for falling flat.

Apple's Face ID Glitch:  This year at the iPhone X launch event the live demo of Apple's new feature Face ID failed because Apple's SVP of Software Engineering, Craig Federighi could not unlock the device using the facial recognition software. This was not the first time when had been a major glitch on stage during an Apple launch event. Previously,  Apple CEO Steve Jobs encountering technical issues on stage at Macworld Expo, NewYork in 2001. The Face ID has also sparked a debate about security and privacy. Apple claims it is significantly more advanced than Touch ID, though media reports have discussed the fact that Face ID does not have the same level of constitutional privacy as a passcode in the United States.

The Failure of Google Glass: Every year Google launches a range of new products that raise high expectations in the tech industry. The tech giant released Google Glass, an augmented reality headset for ordinary customers by end of 2013. The wearable device was developed with the mission of producing a ubiquitous computer. It displayed information in a smartphone-like hands-free format. The headset originally received a great deal of criticism and legislative action due to privacy and safety concerns. On January 15, 2015, Google announced that it would stop producing the Google Glass prototype, instead, it will focus on "future versions " of glass.

Faulty Battery in Galaxy Note 7: South Korean Smartphone maker Samsung released Samsung Galaxy Note 7 on 19 August 2016 as a successor to the Galaxy Note 5. The battery defects caused many Note 7 units to overheat and combust or explode. On 10 October 2016, Samsung Galaxy Note 7 came to an end permanently due to these repeated incidents. In July 2017, Samsung released a refurbished version of the Galaxy Note 7 called Galaxy Note Fan Edition (marketed as Samsung Galaxy Note FE). It has a smaller battery of 3200 mAh and has also gone through an 8-point battery safety check.

Microsoft Lumia Shutdown : Microsoft Lumia (previously the Nokia Lumia Series) is a range of mobile devices originally designed and marketed initially by Nokia and later by Microsoft. Introduced in November 2011, the range came after Microsoft and Nokia announced their partnership where Windows Phone was the primary operating system for Nokia. The company unveiled its first Windows Phone 7-based devices, the mid-range Lumia 710 and high-end Lumia 800, on 26 October 2011 at its Nokia World conference. In 2015 the sales of the smartphone decreased sharply after the introduction of Windows 10 operating system and later Microsoft briefly stopped selling Lumia devices from the Microsoft Store at the end of 2016. In October 2017 Microsoft's corporate vice president, Joe Belfiore, confirmed that Microsoft will no longer sell or manufacture new Windows 10 Mobile devices.

This is Why Our Future Depends on Ability to Continuously Adapt to Latest Technology