DeepTech And Analytics In Driving Optimal Outcomes Across Energy And Water Conservation

India's enormous talent pool is being tapped to tackle some of the country's greatest challenges, including how to provide reliable clean power

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Energy and water are intricately connected. All sources of energy (including electricity) require water in their production processes: the extraction of raw materials, cooling in thermal processes, in cleaning processes, cultivation of crops for biofuels, and powering turbines. Energy is itself required to make water resources available for human use and consumption (including irrigation) through pumping, transportation, treatment, and desalination.

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Society’s acumen on the conjoined management of water and energy resources has developed over time. The relationship, as defined today, stands as simple as the energy intensity in the water sector to water intensity in the energy sector. It is the amount of water needed directly or indirectly for exploration, extraction, generation, and transmission of energy, and the amount of energy needed for extraction, transportation, distribution, collection, treatment, and end-use of water. The energy and water nexus were coined as a focused area of study under the entire nexus to develop an understanding of the interdependencies and complications of water and energy alone. The water for energy and energy for water dependencies revolve around many elemental issues ranging from water management systems and water infrastructure to sustainable energy and efficient systems.

Integrated development of the energy and water policies is of paramount importance and not in isolation from each other. With the high risks that the energy sector is now exposed to, the importance of including water in its strategic plan is more essential than ever before.

Deeptech and analytics play an important role in the conservation of energy and water, the conversation of which was done of forefront by Sridhar Gadhi, founder and executive chairman, Quantela Inc.; Ganes Kesari, co-founder and chief decision scientist; Pedro Bittencourt, consultant, PSR Energy Consulting and Analytics and Naeem Zafar, co-founder and chief executive officer, TeleSense during the TiE Sustainability Summit 2021.

There's no silver bullet to address all the challenges faced by our industry. However, we believe that creating a more intelligent distribution grid can help operators address the demands they face with the infrastructure they have. Intelligent line sensors, data, analytics, and the ability to pre-emptively pinpoint trouble spots can help prevent outages and safety incidents, like wildfires, while demand increases. Comprehensive historical and real-time data, combined with predictive analytics, can guide strategic asset management decisions and allow operators to maximize the value of limited resources like maintenance crews, equipment, and specialized workers, such as vegetation management teams. With data and analytics, utilities can confidently prioritize equipment maintenance and replacement and more effectively plan for a future where demand and complexity outstrip today’s ability to deliver, Gadhi said during the conversation.

“We feel a tremendous sense of urgency to address the issues that face our power distribution system as we prepare for a demanding future in the industry. We believe that the innovative technologies being developed and delivered right now will pave the way for a safer, more efficient, and more powerful future,” Kesari shared.

The emergence of “intelligent” technology has undoubtedly expedited and permitted fascinating new possibilities for studying and saving the earth and animals in the world’s most distant locations. The success of such attempts, however, will be contingent on coordinated efforts by the general public, governments, businesses, and today’s and tomorrow’s inventors.