Career Expos

Startup Costs: $10,000 - $50,000
Part Time: Can be operated part-time.
Franchises Available? No
Online Operation? No

Career expos are simply trade shows that bring potential employers and employees together under one roof. Career expos serve two functions. The first is they give corporations a chance to blow their own horn and explain to potential employees why they are the industry leaders and, more important, why working for their company has advantages over selecting the competition company. The second function career expos serve is that they give people seeking to start, change or upgrade a career an opportunity to blow their horns and explain to the corporations exhibiting at the expo how they can benefit the corporation and what they can bring to the table. As you can see, there is a whole lot of horn blowing going on at career expos, but without question they are an excellent opportunity for both potential employers and potential employees to come together and seek mutually beneficial working relationships and opportunities.

Career Expos Ideas

Reunion Organizer

Bring old classmates together by organizing reunions.

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