Glass Shop

Startup Costs: $10,000 - $50,000
Franchises Available? No
Online Operation? No

Windows, tabletops and mirrors'-the need for glass is everywhere. That's why a glass shop in your community is a good business to start. Operating this kind of specialty business requires experience in glass cutting and glass installation techniques, which is called glazing; or a person with these skills is called a glazier. Providing you or your staff possess this sort of work experience and ability, then opening a glass shop can be a very profitable business to own. There are a great many types of glass installations the business could focus on. Or you may want to specialize in one or two specific areas, such as custom glass table tops or only installing construction equipment glass, such as windshields. This business venture can be costly to establish. However, once you have identified the market that you will be catering to, the business can easily generate profits that can exceed $75,000 per year.

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