Seminar Speaker

Startup Costs: $2,000 - $10,000
Home Based: Can be operated from home.
Franchises Available? No
Online Operation? No

Corporations, associations, and event planners are on the constant lookout for interesting speakers to lecture at corporate events and seminars. If you possess special life experiences in business, travel, finance, or overcoming the odds, then an outstanding opportunity awaits you by becoming a freelance seminar speaker. Initially to secure speaking engagements, create a resume outlining your experience and related skills, and distribute this information to event planners, seminar organizations, and corporations. This is the type of service that is built on word-of-mouth referrals, and if your speeches and lectures are good, you will soon be in demand for speaking engagements across North America, and perhaps the world.

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