Wedding Photographer

Startup Costs: $2,000 - $10,000
Home Based: Can be operated from home.
Part Time: Can be operated part-time.
Franchises Available? No
Online Operation? No

There are a number of different approaches that can be taken when starting a wedding photography business. The first option is to be the wedding photographer, and the second option is to start an agency representing wedding photographers. If you choose the second option, a Web site could be established that would list wedding photographers from across North America along with samples of their photography work. Anyone seeking a wedding photographer would simply log onto the Web site and search the index for photographers in their area. Revenues for the Web site can be generated by charging the photographers a yearly fee to be listed on the site, and the site could generate substantial advertising revenue from related businesses such as wedding planners, caterers, and formalwear rental companies seeking additional exposure.

Wedding Photographer Ideas

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