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Jon Stewart Says Apple Wouldn't Let Him Talk About AI, Forcing His Exit: 'Why Are They So Afraid to Have These Conversations?' "The Problem with Jon Stewart" ran for two seasons on Apple TV+.

By Emily Rella

entrepreneur daily

Comedian Jon Stewart is opening up about why "The Problem with Jon Stewart" was abruptly canceled by Apple TV+ after two seasons — and he's not holding back.

Stewart, who's back at Comedy Central's "The Daily Show" after stepping down in 2015, told audiences on Monday that Apple would not let him discuss AI technology and its potential dangers.

"What is that sensitivity? Why are they so afraid to have these conversations out in the public sphere," he asked his guest, Federal Trade Commission chair Lina Khan.

She replied: "I think it just shows the danger of what happens when you concentrate so much power and so much decision-making in a small number of companies."

Earlier in the show, Stewart went on a rant about AI.

"So while we wait for this thing to cure diseases and solve climate change, it's replacing us in the workforce – not in the future, but now," Stewart said. "So while we wait for this thing to cure diseases and solve climate change, it's replacing us in the workforce – not in the future, but now."

The comedian also revealed that, when he had slated Khan to appear previously on his Apple program, he was explicitly told "no."

Related: U.S. Government, 17 States Sue Amazon Over Antitrust Concerns

"Apple asked us not to do it," Stewart said. "They literally said, 'Please don't talk to her.'"

Stewart's Apple TV+ show ran from 2021 to 2023 with an accompanying podcast where he reportedly had creative control over both programs — except that wasn't the case, Stewart said.

The New York Times first reported that Stewart's Apple show was canceled in October 2023, citing disagreements in "show topics related to China and artificial intelligence" that "were causing concern among Apple executives."

Several states and the Federal government have sued big tech companies like Amazon and Google over alleged monopoly power over their respective industries, namely the online retail market and the search engine market.

Apple was sued in an antitrust lawsuit by the U.S. Department of Justice for monopolization of the smartphone market, which may point towards why Apple was allegedly concerned with Khan appearing on Stewart's former show.

Related: Apple Hit With Antitrust Class Action Lawsuit Over iCloud

Apple has not yet commented on Stewart's accusations.

Stewart hosted "The Daily Show" for 16 years before stepping down in 2015.

Emily Rella

Entrepreneur Staff

Senior News Writer

Emily Rella is a Senior News Writer at Entrepreneur.com. Previously, she was an editor at Verizon Media. Her coverage spans features, business, lifestyle, tech, entertainment, and lifestyle. She is a 2015 graduate of Boston College and a Ridgefield, CT native. Find her on Twitter at @EmilyKRella.

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