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4 Mindset Shifts Creative Entrepreneurs Can Learn From Richard Branson Forget about the money.

By Heidi Lynne Kurter

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Vincenzo Lombardo | Getty Images
Richard Branson

The high school dropout turned successful serial entrepreneur has undoubtedly left his mark on this world. Richard Branson has proven that anything is possible with the power of a strong mindset. With more than 300 businesses under his belt, Branson teaches creative entrepreneurs to take action with passion without overthinking it.

The phrase "creative entrepreneur" far extends the definition of "starving artist." With millennials running the ship, entrepreneurship has taken on a whole new life. Their biggest obstacle is getting caught up in the mindset blocks that keeps them from taking action and making their dreams a reality.

Related: Why Cultivating Your Skills Can Also Cultivate Your Passion

These four mindset shifts will help creative entrepreneurs bridge the gap between their dreams and success.

1. Surround yourself with high achievers.

The most successful people understand the importance of surrounding themselves with people they strive to be like. When Branson was struggling to get Virgin Atlantic off the ground, he leaned heavily on his mentor, Sir Freddie Laker, who had been successful at launching his own airline. Branson is famously quoted as saying "surround yourself with people that are smarter than you, give them everything they need to grow, and your business will thrive."

Having a mentor, coach or someone you look up to will show creative entrepreneurs what's possible helping them turn their goals into moving targets. By having the support of a mentor or coach, entrepreneurs are more likely to succeed. Their knowledge, guidance and impact are invaluable.

2. Cultivate a larger-than-life appetite.

When you stay focused on a dream, opportunities will present themselves. It's up to you whether or not you take them. Branson didn't have the background or experience for any of the businesses he started. All he had were his larger than life goals that fueled him to keep going. Branson explained "creating a business with no experience in that field needn't hold you back, there's always the opportunity to hire those who know more about an area than you."

Related: Stepping Into Big Leadership Shoes? 3 Ways to Bring Your Own Pair.

Setting big, seemingly impossible, goals force creative entrepreneurs to work harder, stay hungry and stretch their potential. Their ability to stay focused will help them to achieve more inspiring more creativity and innovation. Those initial big picture goals will only continue to grow as they continue to achieve each milestone and realize what they're capable of.

3. Live a life of adventure and curiosity.

Branson didn't intend on becoming a serial entrepreneur. It happened because of his curiosity and interest to learn more. Branson has always stuck by one core belief -- don't go into business with the primary intention of making money. Do it because you are passionate, curious and interested in something new. Branson's driving force behind starting each of his businesses is "he enjoys the challenge of trying to do something better than other people."

As creative entrepreneurs, it's easy to seek the money especially since creative fields are known to pay less than technical. Success comes when passion is pursued and achieved. Focus on one thing you're good at, and do it really well. Make yourself an expert in your field and become the go-to person for that specialty.

4. Choose messy action over perfectionism.

With no business degree -- and not even a high school diploma backing his name -- Branson started various businesses in different industries. He could've easily let his dyslexia hold him back from launching his magazine, but he didn't. Instead, he used it to his advantage and adapted his leadership style to it. In an interview with Bloomberg, Branson said "his dyslexia has helped him keep communication efficient, and showed him the importance of delegation."

Related: How to Pursue Your Passion and Reach Your Full Potential

If you have the passion and drive for what you do, take the leap, and figure it out along the way. People believe they need the certifications, the perfect strategy and every decision written out in detail when all they really need is to take action. Forward momentum is better than no momentum. Life is about trial and error. Take action, make mistakes, learn from them and try again until you get it right.

Heidi Lynne Kurter

Global People Development Consultant

Heidi Lynne Kurter is a people development consultant, executive coach, speaker and writer who has helped businesses and organizations around the world hire, train and lead their teams confidently and effectively. Learn more at heidilynneco.com

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